Tuesday, 16 February 2016

JNU Protests and Stern Action by the Government


JNU teachers and students must be made accountable for the public subsidies. There must be regular assessment of their performance. These subsidies are given for a purpose, I wonder if the purpose is being served. If not, the taxpayers have every right to question the subsidies as well as the very existence of the university. You will notice the smugness with which some JNU people respond to such questions. They have a superiority complex. But more than 50% of the teachers and students are not involved in campus politics, whether of the left or the right. So, we cannot brand the entire university as parasitical. However, I think a scientific assessment should be made on the contribution of JNU as compared to other institutions like IITs, etc.

Anti-India sloganeering and posters are part of JNU life. May be government had some intelligence reports in this case, linking these students to terrorist outfits, hence the crack down. The intelligence, police and courts are competent enough to handle the situation. Unfortunately, children of some politicians have come under scrutiny, so there is lot of pressure on the government to be lenient. The opposition is attempting to take political advantage of the situation, that is its right in a democracy. But I think the public opinion does not favour it in this case. Our law enforcement agencies are capable of handling any terrorist linkages. I think these are minor incidents, poor students being misguided by those who enjoy fixed tenures and high pay cheques. Some of the students come from elite families of politicians, bureaucrats and academicians, you will notice that their parents would protect them. The opposition and the professional protesters would make lot of noises in the media as it serves their political purpose. I think the public should question these three sections - who brainwash the students, for whom protests are entertainment - millionaires pretending misery and who run the industry of protests.

We must also understand the philosophy of these protesters. They believe that

1. Society consists of disparate and antagonistic groups that are engaged in a zero sum struggle for hegemony. These groups are classified as hegemonic-marginalised, e.g. men-women, rich-poor, Hindu-Muslim, Brahmin-Dalit, industrialist-worker, landlord-tenant, Aryan-Dravidian, urban-rural, core-periphery, mainstream-tribal, etc.

2. State is an instrument of oppression of the hegemonic groups over the marginalised groups. So, it is an evil that needs to be weakened, until it melts away.

3. Ideologies that emphasise organic unity of the state are the primary enemy of the marginalised groups because they deny antagonism and oppression in society and glorify the state and its components like military, police, intelligence, market, property, family, spirituality, etc.

4. India is an artificial entity put together by the British imperialists. In reality, it is a conglomeration of ethnicities, castes and sects, only united by the Indian state and constitution. Indian constitution has inherent class, caste, religious, linguistic, regional and gender biases that need to be corrected by progressive legislation.

5. Hindutva is the primary enemy of this 'Idea of India' as an artificial entity  because  Hindutva believes that India is a civilisational unity, at least 5000 years old. It believes in the existence of a Hindu core that transcends ethnicity, caste and sect, thus uniting the Hindus and marginalising religious minorities.

6. Only way to defeat Hindutva is perpetuate disparity and antagonism on the lines of class, caste, religion, language, region and gender, so that there is a power struggle in society and Hindus do not vote as a bloc.

7. A coalition and weak government with numerous power centres is the best for the marginalised groups as their interests cannot be bulldozed by a brutal majority.

8. To further weaken the majority, there must be numerous restrictions through license-quota raj, reservations, government control of Hindu temples, non-imposition of a national language, strong laws against gender discrimination to the extent that the onus of proving innocence lies with the accused, etc.

9. The 'Idea of India' will survive only when the Hindu civilisation is fossilised by mythologising and demonising Sanskrit texts, promoting Aryan invasion theory, denying Islamic and Christian atrocities, rejecting scientific and cultural achievements, celebrating anti-Hindus as heroes, etc. Once Hindu civilisation is fossilised like ancient 'pagan' cultures, then the marginalised groups will be liberated from its hegemony.

10. 'Idea of India' project would reach its conclusion with the melting away of the Indian state.

2 comments:

  1. I am happy I found your blog. I found an older article of yours on the book "Breaking India" and then read your recent entry. I share many of your views.

    I want to get straight to the point. There is no doubt in my mind that what we are seeing is the fruitioning of what Malhotra exposed in his book "Breaking India" We are seeing the fault lines erupting and a climate of a civil war being created, with the disenfranchised and brainwashed youth who feel they are representing modernity, progress, civil and human rights and the traditional nationalist Hindus. In other words the foreign powers that are facilitating this are succeeding in their effort. The Indian mind is too colonized to even understand these machinations exist and too crude to detect that they are being played. As I write, already several university campuses are joining the revolution movement. This is an Indian springs in its beginning phase.

    I see no other alternative now but for the Modi-BJP government to take emergency action. Unfortunately, the BJP government is paralysed by fear of public opinion and fear of losing the various election polls, so it does not want to take any decisions that could alienate the youth. However, if it does not take these decisions, the revolution movement will multiply and then it will become too difficult to control without unreasonable violence. I am reminded of the student protests in Tianaman square, the Chinese had to resort to using tanks against the student because the protests had been allowed to multiply to an extent that they could no longer be controlled by peaceful and diplomatic means. The Chinese learned their lesson from this ordeal, that seditious protests against the state should be nipped in the bud; since there has been no such protests again and Chinese students have come to respect their state and even interpret Tianaman square as an "anti-China" demonstration.

    If we take a leaf out of Chanakya on danda-niti we will be able to understand why the Chinese strategy worked, "A king that uses too much punishment on his subjects is hated; a king that uses too little punishment is not respected" The need of the hour is to take uncompromising punitive action against all anti-national forces working in India, including NGOs's, political parties, academics, activists and students. If such action is not taken, then we could well see the disintegration of the state of India soon. Somebody needs to move the Modi government to take this action before it is too late.

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    1. Thank you. The British and the Nehruvian elite have been expert builders of institutions. JNU is one of such institutions. The Hindus need to invest in building their own institutions that can change the geo-civilisational narrative of India.

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